Where to Buy 1943 Nickel

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Robert Abbey Bling 8 Light Chandelier Polished Nickel - S1007

Robert Abbey Bling 8 Light Chandelier Polished Nickel - S1007

- Abbey Chandelier Polished Robert Nickel Light Bling S1007 8

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1943-s Jefferson Nickel - Ngc Ms68 Extremely Sharp Steps Looks Full

1943-s Jefferson Nickel - Ngc Ms68 Extremely Sharp Steps Looks Full

Full Ngc - Extremely 1943-s Ms68 Nickel Steps Jefferson Sharp Looks

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Maxim 21466 Nickel Chantilly 27w 12-light Chandelier

Maxim 21466 Nickel Chantilly 27w 12-light Chandelier

12-light Chantilly Chandelier Maxim Nickel 21466 27w

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Maxim Chantilly 12-light Chandelier Polished Nickel - 21466nkpn

Maxim Chantilly 12-light Chandelier Polished Nickel - 21466nkpn

Polished Nickel - Chandelier 21466nkpn Chantilly 12-light Maxim

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Maxim Lighting 21466nkpn Chantilly 12-light Chandelier In Polished Nickel

Maxim Lighting 21466nkpn Chantilly 12-light Chandelier In Polished Nickel

Polished 12-light Lighting 21466nkpn Nickel Chandelier In Maxim Chantilly

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Maxim Lighting 21466nkpn Chantilly Chandelier Polished Nickel

Maxim Lighting 21466nkpn Chantilly Chandelier Polished Nickel

Chandelier Maxim Nickel Chantilly 21466nkpn Lighting Polished

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1943-p Doubled Die Obverse Jefferson Nickel 5c Fs-106 Ddo - Ngc Ms67 5 Fs

1943-p Doubled Die Obverse Jefferson Nickel 5c Fs-106 Ddo - Ngc Ms67 5 Fs

5c 5 Nickel Fs Fs-106 Doubled Obverse Ddo - Ngc 1943-p Die Jefferson Ms67

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1943 P Jefferson Nickel 5c Ddo Fs-106 Ms67 Ngc Pop 1 None Finer 947509-13

1943 P Jefferson Nickel 5c Ddo Fs-106 Ms67 Ngc Pop 1 None Finer 947509-13

Pop Ddo Finer 1943 Nickel 947509-13 P Ngc Fs-106 None Jefferson 1 5c Ms67

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1943 S Nickel Jefferson Pcgs Ms-68 - Original

1943 S Nickel Jefferson Pcgs Ms-68 - Original

Jefferson Pcgs - Nickel 1943 Original S Ms-68

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19432 Silver Jefferson Nickel Ms-67 Ngc

19432 Silver Jefferson Nickel Ms-67 Ngc

Silver Ngc Ms-67 Nickel Jefferson 19432

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1943 - P Jefferson War Time Nickel Circulated Condition

1943 - P Jefferson War Time Nickel Circulated Condition

Condition - Jefferson 1943 Circulated P Time War Nickel

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1943-p 5c Jefferson Nickel On Steel Cent Planchet Ngc Au

1943-p 5c Jefferson Nickel On Steel Cent Planchet Ngc Au

5c Jefferson Au Nickel 1943-p Planchet Steel Ngc On Cent

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1943 Nickel Near Mint-condition

1943 Nickel Near Mint-condition

Nickel 1943 Near Mint-condition

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1943-s 5c Jefferson Nickel On Steel Cent Planchet Ngc Xf

1943-s 5c Jefferson Nickel On Steel Cent Planchet Ngc Xf

Ngc Cent 1943-s Xf On Planchet Jefferson Nickel 5c Steel

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Framburg 8-light Felicity Foyer Chandelier Nickelblack - 5048pn-mblack

Framburg 8-light Felicity Foyer Chandelier Nickelblack - 5048pn-mblack

5048pn-mblack Chandelier Framburg - Nickelblack Felicity Foyer 8-light

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Elk Lighting White Stone 12-light Chandelier Nickelsunbleached Oak - 69450-8-4

Elk Lighting White Stone 12-light Chandelier Nickelsunbleached Oak - 69450-8-4

Chandelier Oak - Elk Lighting 12-light White Nickelsunbleached Stone 69450-8-4

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See Also: 1942 Penny

Discover The Value Of 1943 Nickels & More!

The 1943 nickel is a unique coin that was produced during a time of scarcity and war. As a result of the shortage of copper and nickel, the U.S. Mint began producing coins with alternative compositions, including the 1943 nickel, which is made up of copper, silver, and manganese.

Despite having a high mintage, the 1943 nickel is highly sought after by collectors due to its historical significance and rarity.

In this article, we will delve into the history and production of the 1943 nickel, as well as its composition and design. We will also explore the factors that affect its value, including condition, rarity, and demand.

Additionally, we will provide price ranges and examples of sales for the 1943 nickel, as well as related coin values such as the 3 over 2 error coin and the 1944 steel penny.

Whether you are a seasoned collector or simply curious about the value of rare coins, this article will provide valuable insight into the world of numismatics.

Discover The Value Of 1943 Nickels More

History and Production

The historical significance of the 1943 nickel, which commemorates Thomas Jefferson and World War II, is underscored by the U.S. Mint's production of war coins with different compositions, including the unique alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese used in the 1943-45 nickel, due to the critical shortage of copper and nickel during the war. This alloy gave the 1943 nickel a distinct appearance and also made it a historical relic.

The U.S. Mint produced 390,519,000 1943 nickels, with most coming from Philadelphia and San Francisco Mints. The 1943 nickel has a bold mint mark for easier sorting after the war, and the 1943-P nickel is the first coin to bear the 'P' mint mark.

The production of the 1943 nickel was a result of the need to conserve strategic resources during World War II. The U.S. government needed copper and nickel for the war effort, which led to the U.S. Mint experimenting with different alloys for coin production. The result was the 1943 nickel, which was made with a composition of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese.

The 1943 nickel was only produced for a few years, and its unique composition and historical significance make it a sought-after collectible item today.

Composition and Design

Commemorating Thomas Jefferson and World War II, the 1943 nickel has a unique alloy composition of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese, which distinguishes it from other nickels minted by the U.S. Mint. The use of copper and nickel as critical resources during the war affected coin production, leading to the creation of war coins with different compositions.

The 1943 nickel was one such coin, produced to reduce the use of nickel in coinage and divert it towards the war effort. Its unique composition made it easily distinguishable from other nickels and a popular collector's item. The 1943 nickel's design features Thomas Jefferson's portrait on the obverse, with the words 'Liberty'and 'In God We Trust'surrounding it.

The reverse has a large 'V'for victory, with the inscription 'United States of America'and 'E Pluribus Unum'above and below it. The bold mint mark indicates the location of the coin's production, with 'P'for Philadelphia and 'S'for San Francisco. Despite being produced in large quantities, the 1943 nickel remains a sought-after collectible due to its historical significance and unique alloy composition.

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Factors Affecting Value

While some may argue that a nickel is just a nickel, the value of a 1943 nickel is affected by a combination of factors.

First, its unique composition plays a significant role in determining its value. Because of the shortage of copper and nickel during World War II, the U.S. Mint produced war coins with different compositions, including the 1943 nickel. This nickel has a unique alloy of 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese, making it distinct from other nickels. The silver content alone gives it some value, as the melt value of its silver content is approximately $1. However, the demand from collectors can significantly increase its value.

Second, the historical significance of the 1943 nickel also affects its value. The coin commemorates Thomas Jefferson and World War II, both significant events in American history. The fact that the coin was produced during the war and with different compositions adds to its historical significance, making it a popular item among collectors.

Additionally, the 1943 nickel has a high mintage, limiting its value potential. The U.S. Mint produced 390,519,000 1943 nickels, with most coming from Philadelphia and San Francisco Mints. However, error coins, such as the double eye error coin and 3 over 2 error coin, can attract a considerable price premium, depending on collector demand.

Price Ranges and Examples

One factor affecting the value of 1943 nickels is their condition. Uncirculated versions can sell for $6-$7, while the highest grade coins can fetch prices of $300 or more. Circulated 1943 nickels in good condition can sell for $2.5-$3, but their value can increase depending on the coin's grade. The value of 1943 nickels also depends on their rarity and any errors that may be present.

For example, the 3 Over 2 Error 1943 nickel is a coveted error coin, with around a thousand specimens known to exist. Even worn specimens of this error coin can easily fetch over $100 on the open market, while higher-graded coins can expect prices in the $300 to $10,000+ range. Other error coins, such as the double eye error coin, can also attract a considerable price premium.

Overall, the value of 1943 nickels is high, with their limited supply and historical significance making them popular among collectors and investors alike.

Related Coin Values

The value of 1943 nickels is not limited to just this commemorative coin, as other coins from the same era also have significant value. For example, the 1943 Steel Penny and the 1943 Half Dollar are also highly sought after by collectors. These coins were produced during a unique moment in history, when the United States faced a shortage of critical resources due to World War II. As a result, the U.S. Mint had to change the composition of its coins, making them highly collectible today.

Collectors are drawn to these coins for a variety of reasons. Some are fascinated by the historical significance of these coins, while others appreciate them for their unique designs and rarity. Additionally, collecting coins can be a fulfilling and rewarding hobby that connects individuals to the past and fosters a sense of community.

As the supply of these coins dwindles over time, their value will likely continue to rise, making them a smart investment for collectors and investors alike.